Introduction:

In the last exercise on 'Use of Phrasal Verbs', we looked at the third type of phrasal verbs in English and how this type 3 phrasal verb (transitive and separable with one particle) compares with the type 2 phrasal verb (transitive and inseparable with one particle).

In this last part of four online exercises on the use of phrasal verbs in English, we will briefly review the previously mentioned phrasal verb types and then focus on the fourth and last type of phrasal verbs, type 4 (transitive and inseparable with two particles). And then at the end, there is a quiz to make sure that you understand the use of all four types.

It is recommended that you do all 4 exercises on the use of phrasal verbs in order. Click here to go to the first exercise on 'How to use English phrasal verbs'.


Review of the first 3 phrasal verb types

In the previous two exercises on 'Use of Phrasal Verbs', we have looked at three of the four different types of phrasal verbs used in English. To remind you what they are, we'll quickly go through them now before we look at the fourth and final type of phrasal verb:

Type 1 Phrasal Verbs: Intransitive with one particle

A phrasal verb that never has an object. For example,

The plane took off.

Type 2 Phrasal Verbs: Transitive and inseparable with one particle

A phrasal verb that has an object that must always follow the particle. For example,

I care about you.

Type 3 Phrasal Verbs: Transitive and separable with one particle

A phrasal verb that has an object that if it is a noun (dog, William, books etc...) can either go between the verb and the particle or after the particle. But if the object is an object pronoun (me, you, him, her, it, us, them), it must always go between the verb and the particle. For example:

I took off my jacket.

I took my jacket off.

I took it off.

Now, let's look at the last and easiest type of phrasal verbs to use, Type 4.

Type 4 Phrasal Verbs: Transitive and inseparable with two particles

Type 4 phrasal verbs are very similar to type 2 phrasal verbs. Both are transitive (they always need an object) and in both you can't separate the verb and/or particle(s) with an object. But the difference is that while type 2 phrasal verbs have a verb and one particle (e.g. 'to look after'), type 4 phrasal verbs have a verb and two particles. For example:

  1. 'I'm looking forward to the weekend.'

  2. 'There's no coffee. We have just run out of it.'

In both examples, there are two particles after the verb. In the first example the particles are 'forward' and 'to' and in the second example they are 'out' and 'of'. In neither of the examples can you place the objects 'the weekend' or 'it' between either the verb and first particle or between the particles. For example, with the second example ('to run out of' means to not have any more of something) both 'we have just run out it of' and 'we have just run it out of' are incorrect. It doesn't matter if the object is a noun or object pronoun, it is the same rule for both.

So, Type 4 phrasal verbs are transitive, with a verb and two particles, and are inseparable.

This is the simplest type of phrasal verb to understand and use, because any phrasal verb that has two particles is always transitive and inseparable.



Quiz: How to use English phrasal verbs part 4

For the following twelve questions, decide if the phrasal verb in the sentence is a type 1 (intransitive with one particle), type 2 (transitive and inseparable with one particle), type 3 (transitive and separable one particle) or a type 4 (transitive and inseparable with two particles) phrasal verb. Choose 'type 1' from the question's selection box for type 1 phrasal verbs, 'type 2' for type 2 phrasal verbs, 'type 3' for type 3 phrasal verbs and 'type 4' for type 4 phrasal verbs. The phrasal verb in each question begins with the verb in brackets () at the end of each sentence. Click on the "Check Answers" button at the bottom of the quiz to check your answers.

When the answer is correct, two icons will appear next to the question. The first is an Additional Information Icon "". Click on this for extra information on the word/phrase and for a translation. The second is a Pronunciation Icon "". Click on this to listen to the pronunciation of the word/phrase and to do a pronunciation speaking test.

1. My parents stood by me when I was arrested for hitting a policeman. (stand)              

Stood by:
The infinitive is 'to stand by somebody'. With this context it means to support/help someone who is having trouble or is having a very difficult time in their life, e.g. 'when I lost my job, my wife stood by me and encouraged me to find another job'. 'to stand by' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "apoyar/respaldar a".

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Stood by:

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2. To be honest, I think he's making it up. I don't think he was attacked. (make)              

Making up:
The infinitive is 'to make something up'. With this context it means to invent a story about something that has happened. It has a very similar meaning to lie, e.g. 'can you stop making up stories and tell the truth'. 'to make up'' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "inventar".

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Making up:

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3. She's your younger sister. It's normal for her to look up to you. (look)              

Look up to:
The infinitive is 'to look up to somebody'. With this context it means that somebody admires or wants to be like another person or other people. It is very common that children look up to sports and movie stars. It has a different meaning with 'something'. The opposite is 'to look down on somebody', where the person thinks they are better than the other person/people. In Spanish: "admirar/respetar".

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Look up to:

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4. I can't hear the music. Can you turn it up? (turn)             

Turn up:
The infinitive is 'to turn something up'. With this context it means to increase the volume, power, heat of something like a fire, oven, stereo or machine etc..., e.g. 'it's getting cold in here, can you turn up the heater'. It is more commonly used in this context than 'increase'. 'to turn up'' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "subir".

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Turn up:

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5. Don't worry, she'll be here. You know that she always turns up late. (turn)              

Turns up:
The infinitive is 'to turn up'. With this context it means that somebody arrives or appears in a place, e.g. 'he turned up here at 10.15am'. It is informal English. It can also be used with things, but is less common and means that something appears. 'to turn up'' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "llegar".

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Turns up:

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6. Before you see the dentist, please fill in this form with all your details. (fill)              

Fill in:
The infinitive is 'to fill something in'. With this context it means to complete a form or something similar with personal details or other information, e.g. 'fill in the application form before sending it to us'. It has the same meaning as 'to fill out'. 'to fill in'' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "rellenar".

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Fill in:

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7. My teacher always used to pick on me at school because I had ginger hair. (pick)              

Pick on:
The infinitive is 'to pick on somebody'. With this context it means to harass or make fun of someone with criticisms or jokes. Normally, the person who is picked on, doesn't like it, e.g. 'it's not right, it's not fair that he picks on you when he's had a bad day'. In Spanish: "meterse con".

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Pick on:

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8. Robert, you've said enough. Can you please shut up now! (shut)              

Shut up:
The infinitive is 'to shut up'. In this context it means that someone stops talking. It is often used as an aggressive order to tell someone to be quiet, e.g. 'don't talk any more, just shut up!' In Spanish: "callerse".

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Shut up:

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9. He's a nice guy, I get on with him really well. (get)              

Get on with:
The infinitive is 'to get on with somebody'. With this context it means that you have a good relationship with somebody. With the negative or 'can't' it means the opposite, e.g. 'he doesn't get on with Sally. They are very different types of people'. The meaning changes if 'somebody' is replaced with 'something'. In Spanish: "llevarse bien con".

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Get on with:

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10. Although it's very noisy, I can put up with the noise. I doesn't affect me. (put)              

Put up with:
The infinitive is 'to put up with something/somebody'. With this context it means that you can tolerate/endure something (like noise, heat etc...) or somebody (a not very pleasant person) that other people may not like, e.g. 'although he does shout a lot, I can put up with him'. It is often used with the verb 'can' in front. In Spanish: "aguantar".

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Put up with:

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11. After my parents died, my grandparents brought me up. (bring)              

Brought up:
The infinitive is 'to bring someone up'. With this context it means to be responsible for and care for a child until they are an adult. It can also be used to educate a child in social skills, e.g. 'my parents brought me up to respect other people'. 'to bring up' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "criar/educar".

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Brought up:

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12. I stayed up until 3 in the morning to finish this report. (stay)              

Stayed up:
The infinitive is 'to stay up'. With this context it means to not go to bed. It is often followed by 'until', when you say what time you went to bed, e.g. 'he stayed up until 1am'. 'to stay up' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "quedarse/levantado".

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Stayed up:

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Practice

Now that you understand the use of these types of phrasal verbs, practise them by creating your own sentences in English.