Introduction:

In the last part of the exercise on 'Use of Phrasal Verbs' in English, we looked at both how verbs and phrasal verbs can either be transitive (they have an object) or intransitive (they don't have an object) and introduced the first two types of phrasal verbs, type 1 (intransitive) and type 2 (transitive phrasal verbs that are inseparable).

In this third part of four online exercises on the use of phrasal verbs in English, we will look at the third type of phrasal verbs and see how it compares with the previous two types. Understanding how phrasal verbs are constructed is fundamental to using them correctly in English.

It is recommended that you do all 4 exercises on the use of phrasal verbs in order. Click here to go to the first exercise on 'How to use English phrasal verbs'.

Click here to do the next part of this exercise on 'How to use English phrasal verbs'.


Type 3 Phrasal Verbs: Transitive and separable with one particle

This third type of phrasal verbs are like type 2 phrasal verbs in that they have an object, they are transitive. They are also made of a verb and one particle (adverb or preposition), e.g. 'to talk over'. But they are different to type 2 phrasal verbs in that their two parts (verb and particle) can be separated by the object. For example:

  1. I took the tie off.

  2. I took off the tie.

Both of the above examples for the phrasal verb 'to take off' (which has the meaning of 'to remove clothes') are correct. This is a type 3 phrasal verb, where the object 'the tie' can either go between the verb and particle (in example 1) or it can go after the particle (in example 2). For type 3 phrasal verbs, if the object is a noun (Peter, car, fish etc...) then it can go either between the verb and particle or after the particle. It makes no difference.

But as nothing about phrasal verbs in English is simple, if the object is an object pronoun (me, you, him, her, it, us, them), then it always has to go between the verb and particle and it can never go after the particle. For example:

  1. He took them off.

  2. He took it off.

  3. He took off them.

The first two examples of the type 3 phrasal verb 'to take off' are correct. The objects 'them' and 'it' are object pronouns and so have to go between the verb and particle. The third example is incorrect. The object is again an object pronoun 'them', but with type 3 phrasal verbs, if the object is an object pronoun it can never go after the particle.

Type 3 phrasal verbs are transitive, with a verb and only have one particle, and can be separable.

Advice

The difference between type 2 phrasal verbs: transitive and inseparable and type 3 phrasal verbs: transitive and separable is a little confusing for people learning English. They often make mistakes when using the object pronoun as the object, separating the verb and particle when they shouldn't or not separating the verb and particle when they should. The majority of transitive phrasal verbs with one particle in English are Type 3, separable.

There are two ways to help you know if the phrasal verb is type 2 or type 3:

  1. Look in a dictionary: Normally, dictionaries provide an example of the phrasal verb with an object pronoun (me, you, him, her, it, us, them) as the object. So, if the object goes after the particle in the example, it's inseparable and a type 2 phrasal verb and if it goes between the verb and the particle, it's separable and a type 3 phrasal verb.

  2. The sound: As a learner of English, you will have read or heard phrasal verbs many times in the past. So, you'll have an instinct about what sounds good or bad. It is recommended to say the phrasal verb with an object pronoun as the object both between the verb and the particle and then after the particle. You should trust your instinct and go with what sounds good.

So now do the below quiz to make sure you are using phrasal verbs correctly when you write or speak in English.



Quiz: How to use English phrasal verbs part 3

This quiz is divided into 2 parts.
For these first six questions, decide if the phrasal verb in the sentence is a type 2 (transitive and inseparable one particle) or type 3 (transitive and separable with one particle) phrasal verb. Choose 'Type 2' from the question's selection box for type 2 phrasal verbs and 'Type 3' for type 3 phrasal verbs. Click on the "Check Answers" button at the bottom of the quiz to check your answers.

When the answer is correct, two icons will appear next to the question. The first is an Additional Information Icon "". Click on this for extra information on the word/phrase and for a translation. The second is a Pronunciation Icon "". Click on this to listen to the pronunciation of the word/phrase and to do a pronunciation speaking test.

1. It's cold outside. You should put your jacket on.
         

Put on:
The infinitive is 'to put something on'. With this context it means to wear clothing, e.g. 'wait a minute, I need to put on the gloves'. 'to put on' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "ponerse algo".

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Put on:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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2. I bumped into Simon yesterday in the street. He's moving to Edinburgh.
         

Bumped into:
The infinitive is 'to bump into something'. With this context it means to meet someone by chance/unexpectedly, e.g. 'I bumped into him in the pub last night'. 'to bump into' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "tropezar con".

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Bumped into:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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3. It's interesting article. Where did you come across it?
         

Come across:
The infinitive is 'to come across something'. With this context it means to find something by chance, e.g. 'I came across these old photos when I was cleaning the basement'. 'to come across' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "encontrar algo ".

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Come across:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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4. Can you take out the rubbish before you go to work tomorrow?
         

Take out:
The infinitive is 'to take something out'. With this context it means to remove rubbish/garbage from the house/flat to the street or bin outside. 'to take out' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "sacar".

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Take out:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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5. Do you know that problem we had? I think I've just worked it out.
         

Worked out:
The infinitive is 'to work something out'. With this context it means to find a solution to an issue, a question or a problem, e.g. 'it was so complicated, it took me hours to work out the answer.' 'to work out' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "resolver".

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Worked out:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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6. Don't worry. I'll look into it and I'll tell you what I find out.
         

Look into:
The infinitive is 'to look into something'. With this context it means to investigate something like a complaint or problem, e.g. 'I looked into his complaint about the police, but I could find no evidence that supports it'. In Spanish: "investigar".

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Look into:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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In this second part, you will find a phrasal verb in each sentence with two gaps, one between the verb and particle and the other after the particle. At the end of each sentence is an object in brackets ( ). You need to fill one of the gaps of each sentence (and only one!) with the object as it is written and leave the other gap blank/empty. Put the object in the gap which sounds the best.


7. Can we count on to be here for 9 am on Sunday?  (you)          

Count on:
This is a Type 2 Phrasal Verb (transitive and inseparable with one particle). The infinitive is 'to count on somebody/something'. With this context it means to be able to depend on/rely on someone to do something, e.g. 'we can't count on them to give us the money before Friday'. In Spanish: "contar con".

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Count on:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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8. We need the interview done by Friday. Can you carry out by then?   (it)          

Carry out:
This is a Type 3 Phrasal Verb (transitive and separable with one particle). The infinitive is 'to carry something out'. With this context it means to perform/do a task, e.g. 'they carried the operation out successfully'. 'to carry out' does have other meanings. In Spanish: "llevar a cabo".

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Carry out:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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9. Do you mind if I turn on ? I want to watch the football.  (the television)          

Turn on:
This is a Type 3 Phrasal Verb (transitive and separable with one particle). The infinitive is 'turn something on'. With this context it means to switch on electrical equipment (computers, TV etc...) or lights. 'to turn on' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "encender".

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Turn on:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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10. He was sat quietly and then he turned on . He started insulting me. (me)            

Turned on:
This is a Type 2 Phrasal Verb (transitive and inseparable with one particle). The infinitive is 'to turn on somebody'. With this context it means to suddenly attack somebody verbally or physically without giving any signs of doing it before, e.g. 'he was playing with the dog and then it turned on him. It bit his arm'. 'to turn on' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "volverse contra".

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Turned on:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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11. I'm afraid he told me that he's gone off . He doesn't want to do it any more. (the idea)            

Gone off:
This is a Type 2 Phrasal Verb (transitive and inseparable with one particle). The infinitive is 'to go off something'. With this context it means to stopping liking an idea, proposal, suggestion, plan etc... It is normally used with the object 'the idea', e.g. 'since we told him how much the holiday would be, he's gone off the idea of coming with us'. 'to go off' does have a lot of different meanings. In Spanish: "ya no le gusta la idea / perder el gusto por ".

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Gone off:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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12. I know that I said that we'd go to Berlin at Easter, but we'll have to put off until summer. (the trip)            

Put off:
This is a Type 3 Phrasal Verb (transitive and separable with one particle). The infinitive is 'put something off'. With this context it means to postpone doing something (like a holiday, meeting, appointment etc...) until a later date, e.g. 'they've put the meeting off until next Friday'. 'to put off' does have different meanings. In Spanish: "posponer/aplazar".

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Put off:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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13. Thanks for picking up . A taxi from the airport to our flat is so expensive. (us)            

Picking up:
This is a Type 3 Phrasal Verb (transitive and separable with one particle). The infinitive is 'to pick somebody up', With this context it means to collect somebody from a place in your own car. Normally, people are picked up from an airport by friends or family after a holiday. 'to pick up' does have different meanings. In Spanish: "recoger".

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Picking up:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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14. When the president was caught with his lover, the opposition called for . (his resignation)            

Called for:
This is a Type 2 Phrasal Verb (transitive and inseparable with one particle). The infinitive is 'to call for something'. With this context it means to demand that something happens. It is often used in political contexts, e.g. 'they are calling for new elections'. In Spanish: "exigir".

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Called for:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
To check your pronunciation of this word/phrase, first click on the microphone icon () below. Then allow the browser to record your voice and then say the above word/phrase. Although this test is good, it sometimes does not recognise some of the words/phrases.

       

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Click here to do the next part of this exercise on 'How to use English phrasal verbs'.




Practice

Now that you understand the use of these types of phrasal verbs, practise them by creating your own sentences in English.