Introduction:

In both business and private life it is very common to meet new people. Often, you will you be introduced to new people by somebody who already knows them (e.g. a friend will introduce you to one of their friends you haven't met before). In English, there are different polite phrases that are used to both introduce people together and how to respond/answer when being introduced. Also, there are phrases which can be used to say that you already know somebody when being introduced.

And you'll learn how to do all of this here.

In this online exercise on introduction phrases in English, you'll learn and remember phrases that you can use to introduce one person to another person. In addition, you'll also learn what phrases to use and things to say when you are being introduced to somebody by another person.

Although the vocabulary used here is focused on business and formal situations, it can also be used in less formal situations as well.

It's not just what you say, but what you do

Before you learn the phrases to introduce people, there is something else you need to know. Like in most countries, when you meet somebody for the first time in English-speaking countries, it is polite to shake hands with the person (with both men and women). But it is not common in the English-speaking world for people to kiss each other on the cheek in introductions.

To learn the English phrases used to introduce yourself to people you don't know, do our exercise on 'How to introduce yourself in English phrases'.

To learn the English phrases used to end a conservation and say goodbye, do our exercise on 'How to say goodbye in English phrases'.


Exercise: Introducing people in a meeting

Read the following conversation where Andrew is being introduced by Sally to the other people attending a meeting.

From the context, try to guess what the meaning of the words/phrases in bold are. Then do the quiz at the end to check if you are right.

Sally:'Hi Andrew, how are you?'

Andrew:'Fine, thanks. And yourself?'

Sally:'I'm very well, thanks. I appreciate you coming to the meeting today. Andrew, let me introduce you to Claire. She's our sales representative in Dublin.'

Andrew:'Pleased to meet you.'

(Handshake)

Claire:'Pleased to meet you too.'

Sally:'You already know Jeff.'

Andrew:'Yes, we have met before. Hi Jeff.'

(Handshake)

Jeff:'Hi, Andrew. Good to see you again.'

Andrew:'And you too.'

Sally:'And I don't believe you know Mr Samuels?'

Andrew:'No, I don't believe so. Hello Mr Samuels.'

(Handshake)

Mr Peter Samuels:'Hello Andrew. Call me Peter.'

Sally:'And you've already met John.'

Andrew:'Yes, we met when I arrived here today.'

Sally:'And lastly, this is Kate.'

Andrew:'How do you do?'

(Handshake)

Kate:'How do you do?'

Sally:'Anyway, now that the introductions are over, lets start the meeting.'



Quiz: How to introduce people in English phrases

Below is a definition/description of each of the words in bold from the above text. Now choose the word/phrase from the question's selection box which you believe answers each question. Only use one word/phrase once (except for 'How do you do'). Click on the "Check Answers" button at the bottom of the quiz to check your answers.

When the answer is correct, two icons will appear next to the question. The first is an Additional Information Icon "". Click on this for extra information on the word/phrase and for a translation. The second is a Pronunciation Icon "". Click on this to listen to the pronunciation of the word/phrase and to do a pronunciation speaking test.

1. A phrase that somebody uses when they think that the two people they are introducing to each other have met before that day, is
         

You already know:
(phrase) This phrase is used in an introduction when the person introducing two people to each other knows or thinks that the two people already know each other. You would only use this phrase in a situation where there is a mixture of people who the person you are introducing both does and doesn't know. In this situation, it is polite to introduce the person to everybody (both the people they know and don't know) and this is when this phrase is used. You always have to follow 'you already know' with the name of the person you are introducing someone to, e.g. 'you already know Peter'.

Another phrase that is similar is 'you have already met', but 'you have already met' is only used when the two people met for the first time earlier that day, and 'you already know' is normally used when you know that the two people you are introducing to each other have known each other for longer. Normally, after using 'you already know', the person being introduced would confirm this by saying 'yes, I do' or 'yes, we've met before' and then say hello and shake hands. For example, 'you already know Peter' 'yes, I do. hello Peter' 'hello Simon'.

In Spanish: "usted ya lo conoce".

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You already know:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
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2. When a person says 'pleased to meet you', you answer them by saying
         

Pleased to meet you too:
(phrase) 'pleased to me you' is a formal phrase that is used to be polite during an introduction. When somebody says this to you, you answer them by saying 'pleased to meet you too'. For example, 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'pleased to meet you' 'pleased to meet you too'. Both of these phrases are used for politeness.

When being introduced by somebody to another person, you can repeat the name of the other person at the end of both of these phrases (but it is not common or necessary to do it). For example, 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'pleased to meet you Rebecca' 'pleased to meet you too Simon'.

In Spanish: "encantado (de conocerlo) / mucho gusto (en conocerlo)".

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Pleased to meet you too:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
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3. A polite phrase that contains 'how' and is said directly after two people have been introduced, is
         

How do you do:
(phrase) 'how do you do' is a phrase that is used to be polite during an introduction. When somebody is introducing two people to each other, this phrase is said by the person whose name was said first to the person they are being introduced to, e.g. 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'how do you do'.

It is polite when somebody has said 'how do you do' to respond to them by saying 'how do you do'. For example, 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'how do you do' 'how do you do'. Another phrase which has the same meaning is 'pleased to me you' (or 'nice to meet you'). The only difference between 'pleased to me you' and 'how do you do' is that 'pleased to me you' sounds politer and more formal.

In Spanish: "es un placer".

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How do you do:

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4. A formal phrase that is used when you want to introduce one person to another person that includes the word 'don't', is
         

I don't believe you know:
(phrase) This is a formal and polite way to introduce two people to each other. It is basically a different way of saying 'let me introduce you to' or 'this is' ('this is' sounds more informal than the other two phrases, but is commonly used in formal situations as well). All three phrases are used when you think that the two people being introduced don't know each other. With the first introduction, you have to say the name of the person who you are introducing in front of all of these three phrases and then the name of the person they are being introduced to after the phrases, e.g. 'Simon, I don't believe you know Chris'.

When introducing a person to a group of people, after the first introduction, it is not necessary to say the name of the person you are introducing in front of the phrase again, e.g, 'I don’t believe you know Rachel Sharpe'. You can also say what the job/position of the person you are introducing them to is (added after the name). For example, 'I don’t believe you know Rachel Sharpe, our head of marketing' or 'Simon, I don’t believe you know Chris, who is a sales manager for Mercedes'.

In Spanish: " no creo que lo conozca".

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I don't believe you know:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
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5. A phrase that somebody uses when they know that the two people they are introducing to each other met for the first time earlier that day, is
         

You've already met:
(phrase) This phrase is used in an introduction when the person introducing two people to each other knows that the two people were introduced to each other for the first time earlier that day. You would only use this phrase in a situation where there is a mixture of people who the person you are introducing both does and doesn't know. In this situation, it is polite to introduce the person to everybody (both the people they know and don't know) and this is when this phrase is used. You always have to follow 'you've already met' with the name of the person you are introducing someone to, e.g. 'you've already met Peter'.

Another phrase that is similar is 'you already know', but 'you have already met' is only used when the two people met for the first time earlier that day, and 'you already know' is normally used when you know that the two people you are introducing to each other have known each other for longer. Normally, after using 'you've already met', the two people being introduced don't say anything, they often just shake hands.

In Spanish: "ya lo conocia".

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You've already met:

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6. When a person says 'how do you do?', you answer them by saying
         

How do you do:
(phrase) 'how do you do' is a phrase that is used to be polite during an introduction. When somebody says this to you, you answer them by saying the same phrase back to them. For example, 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'how do you do?' 'how do you do?'. Both of these phrases are used for politeness.

In Spanish: "el placer es mío".

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How do you do:

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7. A phrase that is used to say that you already know a person you are being introduced to, is
         

We have met before:
(phrase) This phrase is used by somebody who is being introduced to another person to say that you already know the person. It is used after somebody has introduced you to the other person, e.g. 'Peter, this is Simon' 'we have met before'. It is polite after saying this phrase to say hello to the person (e.g. 'hello/hi Simon' or 'good to see you again') and/or ask how they are (e.g. 'how are you?'). For example, 'Peter, let me introduce you to Simon' 'we have met before. hello Peter, how are you?'.

In Spanish: "ya nos conocemos".

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We have met before:

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8. A polite phrase that contains 'pleased' and is said directly after two people have been introduced, is
         

Pleased to meet you:
(phrase) 'pleased to me you' or 'nice to meet you' is a formal phrase that is used to be polite during an introduction. When somebody is introducing two people to each other, this phrase is said by the person whose name was said first to the person they are being introduced to, e.g. 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'pleased to meet you'.

When being introduced by somebody to another person, you can repeat the name of this other person at the end of the phrase (but it is not common or necessary to do it). For example, 'Simon, this is Rebecca' 'pleased to meet you Rebecca'. It is polite when somebody has said 'pleased to meet you' to respond to them by saying 'pleased to meet you too'.

Another phrase which has the same meaning is 'how do you do'. The only difference between 'pleased to me you' and 'how do you do' is that 'pleased to meet you' sounds politer and more formal.

In Spanish: "encantado (de conocerlo) / mucho gusto (en conocerlo)".

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Pleased to meet you:

Pronunciation Speaking Test:
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9. A short phrase used to introduce one person to another person that is used like 'let me introduce you to' or 'I don't believe you know', is
         

This is:
(phrase) This phrase is the most commonly used way to introduce two people to each other. It is basically a different way of saying 'I don't believe you know' or 'let me introduce you to'. The difference between those phrases and 'this is' is that 'this is' sounds more informal (but it is still commonly used in formal situations).

All three phrases are used when you think that the two people being introduced don't know each other. With the first introduction, you have to say the name of the person who you are introducing in front of all of these three phrases and then the name of the person they are being introduced to after the phrases, e.g. 'Simon, this is Chris'.

When introducing a person to a group of people, after the first introduction, it is not necessary to say the name of the person you are introducing in front of the phrase again, e.g, 'this is Rachel Sharpe'. You can also say what the job of the person you are introducing them to is (added after the name). For example, 'this is Rachel Sharpe, our head of marketing' or 'Simon, this is Chris, who is a sales manager for Mercedes'.

In Spanish: "le prensento al".

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This is:

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10. A polite phrase used to say that somebody is 'happy/pleased' to meet somebody again, is
         

Good to see you again:
(phrase) When two people who already know each other are introduced, it is polite to say 'good to see you again'. This phrase can be used by either of the two people being introduced to each other. But it should only be used after one of the two has said 'we have already met'. For example, 'Peter, this is Simon' 'we have met before. hello Simon, good to see you again'.

After somebody has said this, it is polite for the other person to respond/answer by saying 'and you too'. Some people replace the word 'see' with 'meet' (e.g. 'good to meet you again') with the same meaning.

In Spanish: "me alegro de volver a verle".

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Good to see you again:

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11. A formal phrase that is used when you want to introduce one person to another person that includes the word 'me', is
         

Let me introduce you to:
(phrase) This is a formal and polite way to introduce two people to each other. It is basically a different way of saying 'I don't believe you know' or 'this is' ('this is' sounds more informal than the other two phrases, but is commonly used in formal situations as well). All three phrases are used when you think that the two people being introduced don't know each other. With the first introduction, you have to say the name of the person who you are introducing in front of all of these three phrases and then the name of the person they are being introduced to after the phrases, e.g. 'Simon, let me introduce you to Chris'.

When introducing a person to a group of people, after the first introduction, it is not necessary to say the name of the person you are introducing in front of the phrase again, e.g, 'let me introduce you to Rachel Sharpe'. You can also say what the job of the person you are introducing them to is (added after the name). For example, 'let me introduce you to Rachel Sharpe, our head of marketing' or 'Simon, let me introduce you to Chris, who is a sales manager for Mercedes'.

In Spanish: "permítame presentarle a / le presento a".

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Let me introduce you to:

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12. When one person who is being introduced says 'good to see you again', it is polite for the other person to respond/reply by saying
         

And you too:
(phrase) This phrase is used for politeness. In an introduction, when one of the two people being introduced has said 'good to see you again' or 'good to meet you again', the other person should respond/answer them by saying 'and you too'. For example, 'Peter, this is Simon' 'we have met before. hello Simon, good to see you again' 'and you too'. If you don't respond by saying 'and you too', it is very rude/impolite.

In Spanish: "y yo tambien".

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And you too:

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13. A phrase which is used to say that you can call the person you are being introduced to by their first name instead of their formal name (e.g. Mrs Smith), is
         

Call me:
(phrase) In some formal or business situations (especially when being introduced to important clients or people), a person may be introduced by their formal name (e.g. Mr Ward, Mrs Jones etc...) instead of their first name (e.g. Rebecca) or their full name (e.g. Rebecca Ward). For example, 'Simon, let me introduce you to Mrs Ward'.

If somebody is introduced to you by their formal name, you have to call them by this formal name (e.g. 'Simon, let me introduce you to Mrs Ward' 'pleased to meet you Mrs Ward'). But in the English-speaking world it is polite and normal for the person who has been introduced by their formal name to give the other person permission to call them by their first name. This is done by saying 'call me' followed by their first name (e.g. 'call me Rebecca'). For example, 'Simon, let me introduce you to Mrs Ward' 'pleased to meet you Mrs Ward' 'call me Rebecca'.

If a person is introduced to you by their full name (e.g. Rebecca Ward), it is normal just to call them by their first name afterwards.

In Spanish: "puedes llamarme".

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Call me:

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Practice

Now that you understand the new vocabulary, practise it by creating your own sentences with the new words/phrases.